Back to Blog

Richmond Tree Experts will match or beat any quote you get from their competitors!

Tweet

Richmond is licensed and bonded. You won't be disappointed with their service, because Pat Lombardo and his team are dedicated to over-delivering for their customers. Consumer Investigator Dale Cardwell, president of TRUSTDale.com, trusts Richmond Tree Experts to be the very best, at the very best price! Click HERE to receive your exclusive Richmond Tree Experts/TD Deal of a Free Stump Removal on services costing $900.00 or more! Plus, you get the TRUSTDale Make It Right Guarantee!

TRUSTDale Tip of the Day: *New Tree Planting

Think of the tree you just purchased as a lifetime investment. How well your tree, and investment, grows depends on the type of tree and location you select for planting, the care you provide when the tree is planted, and follow-up care the tree receives after planting.

The ideal time to plant trees and shrubs is during the dormant season and in the fall after leaf drop or early spring before budbreak. Weather conditions are cool and allow plants to establish roots in the new location before spring rains and summer heat stimulate new top growth. However, trees properly cared for in the nursery or garden center, and given the appropriate care during transport to prevent damage, can be planted throughout the growing season. In tropical and subtropical climates where trees grow year round, any time is a good time to plant a tree, provided that sufficient water is available. In either situation, proper handling during planting is essential to ensure a healthy future for new trees and shrubs. Before you begin planting your tree, be sure you have had all underground utilities located prior to digging.

If the tree you are planting is balled or bare root, it is important to understand that its root system has been reduced by 90 to 95 percent of its original size during transplanting. As a result of the trauma caused by the digging process, trees commonly exhibit what is known as transplant shock. Containerized trees may also experience transplant shock, particularly if they have circling roots that must be cut. Transplant shock is indicated by slow growth and reduced vigor following transplanting. Proper site preparation before and during planting coupled with good follow-up care reduces the amount of time the plant experiences transplant shock and allows the tree to quickly establish in its new location.

*Source: http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/tree_planting.aspx